Articles

In many spiritual paths there is a concept of balance between Dark and Light. This is so in Taoism, as it is in Kabbalah. Spiritual societies, such as occult orders or even Freemasons, utilize the concept in physical form – shaping two pillars. Often is the case that one pillar is colored black, while the other is white. In my own practice I have two altars on opposite sides of my meditation space. One represents the Light, and the other the Dark. It may seem strange to make any gestures to the Dark, but there is reason. Only in an extreme is Darkness evil. The path of the Dark has attributes of Strength, Severity and Individuality. In balance with the Light (and it’s counterpart attributes) is truth, but unbalanced the Dark becomes a fall into mortality, and self-destruction. In the audio-book, “Lords of the Sith,” there is a moment early…

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Although not common, there are spiritual sects that chose to follow the path of spirituality to the exclusion of the physical experience. We could call this to be unbalanced with Light Alone, or from the Star Wars universe, we could think of it as being unbalanced in the light of Ashla. Ashla is mentioned (along with its twin Bogan) in the novel Into the Void, and which I discuss in detail in a separate article. I was once one of these people. I suppose the allure of such a practice, is to escape a world of pain and suffering. Recently I was reminded of why the path of Light alone can lead to its own for of suffering. Doing Nothing When I sought the Light Alone, I told myself that any action within the world was contaminated with its own karma.  Every action (karma) as a reaction (karma).   I…

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Introduction For this to work, one must first understand and comprehend The System: https://forcepower.org/chaos-systems-how-it-works/ If you also understand my thoughts on Creation from Flower of Life, you will have the gnosis that the greater “you” is a powerful Creator. Traditionally, in many hermetic and occult schools there is a practice of opening the Four directions with the powers of one’s declared faith. One of the common forms of this in the West is the Lesser Banishing Ritual of the Pentagram.  The formula, is to draw upon a symbol, which is cast to each direction around the initiate.  Inside the invisible circle that is made, the aspirant calls to a force represented in each direction.  In the LBRP, these beings are Kabbalaistic angels (Gabriel, Michael, Uriel, and Raphiel.) However, these are just masks of the one Force and not self-existent beings that come to sit with you.   What one is…

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In the stories from the Star Wars universe, we see a depiction of the spiritual life as something of a monastic adventure. The Jedi are cautioned from strong emotions, ties and attachments. Relationships, they tell us, are prone to attachments that lead to fear… and of course fear leads to anger and anger is the path of destruction. How well does this translate to our world? Many religious groups do harken to this same concept of monasticism. Buddhism, Hinduism, and Catholicism all have uses of the monastic life. I can’t speak to the reasons behind monasticism in each order or religious society, but as a once Buddhist, I can attest to the idea that I was told. Having personal relationships leads to its own complications. From the Buddhist perspective (at least the school I was once part of), the path to total enlightenment is best attained when there is no…

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Over the past few weeks I’ve been noticing I’ve been able to infer meaning from silent intuition. I’ve been able to feel meaning in the words of others, in their languages that I do not know, but I can tell what they say. This is deeper than I’ve ever gone before. An old woman, speaking Spanish, and I know her intent and meaning. I can tell what she wants, in the most simple terms. Other conversations, people and situations… I can feel the outcome, as long as I can detach from my body awareness.

In the book, Kenobe: Star Wars Legends, one of the characters says to Obi-Wan, “you don’t escape a trap by luring others in.” It’s a true statement. So often we can find ourselves stuck, rooted or frustrated in a problem. Many will seek to find another to occupy the space with them. Perhaps they look for a new friend, a relationship – either way it becomes a trap now for two (or more). Escaping the traps of life requires introspection, and then applying the appropriate antidote to the problem. Distractions (people, entertainment, etc.) just distract us from the cage we find ourselves in. “It isn’t a cage, I don’t see any bars anymore… I’m a free person enjoying myself,” so says the trapped individual. Everyone is initially trapped in materialism, and it takes considerable effort to work our way out of the physical confines that root us in place. Overall…

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Sometimes things need to collapse. Situation: Anger at feeling the stress of doing too much. Anaylsis: how is the force using this with me? Helping me realize I need to let go. I can’t hold on to too many stones. Sometimes I need to let things go and allow things to collapse. The force isn’t about keeping things going, but sometimes allowing things to fall apart.

When working with modern myth, it may seem less “real” than an ancient myth. Many find comfort or power in the Greek, Canaanite, and Hebrew myths. How often I see books by great authors on the power of the Greek Magical Papyri, or on summoning a Canaanite god for personal growth. Hecate, the Greek goddess of witchcraft, is one of the most common pagan goddesses utilized by the modern occultist and lest we forget, the Hebrew mythos of Kabbalah is the infused system across all spiritual societies today. Whether a person studies Freemasonry, Martinism, Elus Coen, Aurum Solis, Thelema or most forms of witchcraft, the role of Kabbalah is prominent. A common thought in occult systems is that people need to find truth in old, ancient tombs of knowledge. Somehow the escapist idea that someone else knows more about the Universe than you do is appealing. I suppose it’s due…

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Non fiction Tao Te Ching Liber LXV, by Aleister Crowley Hidden Zen, by Meido Moore The Light on the Path, by Mabel Collins Alchemy: Ancient and Modern, by H. Stanely Redgrove Syzygy: Reflections on the Monastery of the Seven Rays Dreams of Light, by Andrew Holecek Works of B.O.T.A. Taoist Meditation, by Thomas Cleary Living in the Tao, by Mantak Chia Doaist Magical Transformation, by Jerry A. Johnson Sigil Magick, by Anousen Leonte Evocation through sigil magick, by Anousen Leonte Gnostic Magick, by Anousen Leonte The Telekinesis Training Method, by Sean McNamara Hemi-Sync audio products HeartMath devices & material Fiction Star Wars Movies Darth Plagueis (Audiobook) Light of the Jedi (Audiobook) Into the Dark

In Hidden Zen by Meido Moore he describes a technique eye resting during meditation. Rather than closed eyes, rather than focusing on a point or figure, Moore suggests casting one’s vision wide – as though they are looking at the horizon. He offers the idea of raising two index fingers, on either side, until they just come into one’s peripheral vision. Holding that wide and relaxed gaze, continue with the meditation. Throughout Hidden Zen, Moore provides several variations of this practice. Some examples are in how to use this practice to draw in a scene at a park, or a busy urban area, or an isolated location. Each is different in its variation. I think these ideas are wonderful, but keep in mind he does come across as biased. There are times when focuses pointedly may make more sense, or when closing one’s eyes may make more sense. It really…

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